Delroy Edwards Launches New Label L.A. Club Resource; Set To Release Label’s First 12″

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Delroy Edwards has had quite the past two years. His 4 Club Use Only 12″ on Long Island Electrical Systems (L.I.E.S) was a standout last year and he seemed to only look better with the Heart And Soul / Sprk The Dust white label rounding out 2012 and this year’s White Owl 12″.

Delroy Edwards announced the launch of his new label, L.A Club Resource, and also that he will make the first release on it with the Untitled EP (artwork for which is above). It’s surprise from listening to the two preview clips that are floating around that both cuts are the type of noisy house/techno hybrid Edwards is well known for. The label’s second release is set to be three variations of “Waxwork” by DJ Harlow.

Until then check out Delroy Edward’s recent mix for New Forms Festival featuring future releases for the label, including his upcoming ‘Untitled EP.’

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Blouse – Imperium

This Tuesday Blouse released their latest LP, titled Imperium.  As with any sophomore release, there is usually a degree of pressure felt by the artists to either continue with their initial musical stylings that built their fanbase, or deviate from them to create a more innovative album.  Bands that have attempted the latter have been met with varying rates of success (see MGMT’s Congratulations or Arcade Fire’s Neon Bible).  With Blouse’s self-titled debut being one of my favorite albums of 2011, I was hoping for another synthed- out, dream-pop, ’80’s throwback album.  However, after hearing the first single “No Shelter”, I was surprised to hear a more crisp, less synth driven sound.  The new album is based around “intruments that don’t plug into the wall” as band member Jacob Portrait (also bassist for Unknown Mortal Orchestra) puts it.  This is not necessarily a bad thing, despite a drastic change in style, the band still manages to produce infectious songs veiled in an air of longing and nostalgia.  When listening to Imperium I am slightly reminded of Tame Impala, though the distinction is clear.  Even though it’s not EXACTLY what I was hoping for, Imperium does not disappoint.

-Denali

Le1f – Tree House

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Le1f has had a busy year. Following the joyous reception of his debut mixtape Dark York, the “Combination Pizza Hut and Taco Bell” producer has been hard at work crafting the follow-up to that record. Earlier this year came the Flyzone EP and after a few delays, Tree House was released this week. This new mixtape features some bubbly percussion from the likes of The-Drum and Boody. Less frantic than his past releases, Tree House is a bit more influenced by R&B and chill electronic slow jams. It’s intensely more sexy, especially on the hypnotic stand-out “Oils” and the minimal techno rap of “Jack”. Le1f’s distinctive fried voice and bursts of rapid-fire rapping make Tree House another stellar addition to his futuristic discography.

Emily Reo & Friends Pullman House Show

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Sunday night something magical happened in Pullman. And no, I’m not referring to the storm raging outside (although that added quite a bit to the ambiance). I’m referring to the musical storm of holyfuckthisisamazingness that was raging inside of the newly-dubbed residence Maiden Haven, located on College Hill. The culprits behind this shit-storm of excellence were three very talented and extremely nice individuals playing under the monikers Cuddle Formation, Peace Arrow, and Emily Reo.

The night started out on an awesome, but unassuming, note with a few rounds of Mario Kart 64. Some won. Some lost. Some ended up spending more time stuck in a corner than on the track (names not provided to protect the Mario Kart-inept). While the party of about 20 people was engaged in watching the video game, Noah Klein slowly and quietly set up his equipment for his Cuddle Formation set, which consisted of an electric guitar, looping pedals, and some other technological musical equipment that I haven’t the knowledge to explain. He put it all on a patterned mat and sat in front of it like a gypsy getting prepared to read tarot cards. He stayed there the entire time, bewitching us with his dreamy and unique blend of sounds.

 

Up next was Mitch Myers with his project Peace Arrow. And let me tell you, none of us were prepared for his set. I’m not exaggerating at all when I say my jaw was just hanging open at points during his set. Using a guitar, a looping station, some effect pedals, and a floor tom and high hat that we managed to scrounge up for him; he gave us the most raw, animalistic performance I’ve witnessed to date. Sometimes singing, sometimes shrieking, sometimes doing complicated riffs on his guitar, sometimes banging on the drum like he’s trying to get a part in that Nick Cannon movie Drum Line (don’t tell me you don’t remember it). And apparently God has a new job as a lighting technician because thunder and lightning started raging outside in the middle of his set as if it was cued exclusively for his set. It was intense. To quote my homegirl Erin, “I think we just saw Animal Collective play.”

 

The grand finale of the evening was, of course, the adorable Emily Reo. Most of us at KZUU had been jamming to her album for the entire week before so we knew it was going to be fantastic and she most definitely did not disappoint. With a projection of flowers, stars, and possibly beehives (?) behind her, she delivered an effortless, euphoric, vocoder-filled performance of songs from her latest release Olive Juice, including “Wind”, “Coast”, “Peach”, and her cover of Built to Spill’s “Car”.

 

Despite our desires for “one more song”, the music eventually ended. The party did not. But that’s a story for another time….

Long live Maiden Haven.

– Jasmine

Sun Glitters – “Only You”

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KZUU is bringing you a new track from Sun Glitters called “Only You”. Sun Glitters (aka Victor Ferreira) is an electronic producer from Luxembourg known for his lush, sun drenched, choppy tunes that always remind you of those warm summer days. Yes, summer has now come to an end for most of us but we can dream, right? After releasing his debut album in 2011 and releasing a handful of EPs and singles, it is exciting news that Sun Glitters will be releasing his first full length on November 26th entitled Scattered Into Light (via Mush).

“Only You” is the first preview we have gotten off of his upcoming release which definitely makes it something to look forward to. The track starts off lightly then builds up as he slowly adds in more and more layers of sound. The reverb, echoing synths, crackly texture, and chopped up vocals of Sara Cappai of this track will leave you day dreaming about a sunnier day.

Stream “Only You” below.

You can check out more of his music on his soundcloud and more of Sara Cappai’s work with Diverting Duo here.

-Erin

Body/Head – Coming Apart

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Coming Apart is the debut album of Kim Gordon’s side project Body/Head. Teaming up with Bill Nace (experimental guitarist extraordinaire), Gordon’s new album is a surreal exploration of sound.

Even though Coming Apart was made with just the duo’s guitars and Gordon’s vocals, the album never feels like it’s missing anything. In fact, the album feels very full, almost engulfing. Gordon and Nace masterfully occupy the airspace in the album, sometimes with a less-is-more approach, and sometimes with continuous, crashing waves of distortion. If you listen closely you can hear small segments of Sonic Youth inspired guitar work here and there, but the album does not at all rely or even often fall back on these elements, instead Gordon shows she’s perfectly capable creating something of her own. Speaking of Gordon, her vocals in the album are some of it’s most intriguing elements. She stretches her monotone moans over wide areas of distortion in true experimental fashion

In terms of where you should start, find an hour where you’re not doing anything an start at the very beginning; this album is not so much something that you listen to but more so something that you fall into, an experience. I don’t know if I’d call it a concept album, but it has that engrossing feeling of one. If given your attention, this album will easily mesmerize you for 1:08:03

I haven’t seen them live myself but from what I’ve seen they play a rad show in front of a bunch of slow motion movies off a projector, I can only imagine it being a very cool experience and I highly suggest going to see them if you ever get the chance.BodyHead6776844510_a39ec7254f_b

Coming Apart is out now via Matador Records.

Factory Floor’s analog noise

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DFA Records has the reputation of releasing the best of the now mostly dead “dance punk” genre. LCD Soundsystem, Yacht, The Rapture, and Hercules and Love Affair all have releases on the label. Even the very DJ friendly, dancefloor ready sounds of The Juan Maclean and Black Dice have sounded close at home to their dance punk counterparts. Factory Floor changes all that by being not just ready for the dancefloor, but being the first distinctly experimental group on the label.

Analog is the key for the threesome from London. The group uses analog equipment from synthesizers, modulators, drum machines, and sequencers, along with the addition of a drum kit and guitar. The use of analog gives the group’s self titled debut full length a nice warm organic sound to it. Factory Floor also uses distinctly noisy sounds which never feel brutal, but more fuzzy than anything (although if you’re looking for something menacing, this Perc remix does quite nicely). 

The lead single “Two Different Ways” is the best exemplar of these qualities. The synth line almost harkens back to Mr. Fingers style acid house, but it still retains the experimental and industrial quality of Throbbing Gristle. The added use of vocals from Nikki Colk (who appeared as Void in the group Carter Tutti Void, with members of X-TG and Throbbing Gristle) really deepens the effect of the track.

Factory Floor isn’t without a misstep though. The tracks on the album sometimes run bleed together, with a clear sense of difference in each song. Luckily three interludes (the ingeniously named “One”, “Two”, and “Three”) break the album up nicely, serving as nice segues.

Factory Floor is out on September 10th through DFA Records. Until check out “Two Different Ways”